Involving the local community in the production of any site specific artwork is central to its success.

Community involvement in producing artwork for public places does not mean the work must be of a lower quality. Good community artwork using the artists expertise in the right manner should produce the highest quality results. In fact the work must do so in order to foster the necessary respect for the work from the community, and to give the maximum pride in their achievement for those who took part.

Community involvement and consultation can take a wide range of forms, falling into four main areas:

• Pre-design consultation and research
In creating a work that has true regard for its site local research can prove crucial. This research can take the form of both archive investigation and simply talking to local residents and other community members. In the past Gary has undertaken oral history workshops with local elderly people to discover personal stories of a local neighbourhood and held stalls at local fairs to publicise and consult on planned works.

• Design consultation
All the above starting points offer a rich soup of inspiration from which Gary can draw up specific designs. On most projects two or three design options are produced. These design options can then be further consulted on to ensure broad support for the work. Design consultation also helps bring the public along with the development of the work, aiding publicity and preventing any feelings of work just appearing in a community.

• Parallel art workshops
Parallel workshops are an excellent way to involve local interested parties in an artwork that does not allow participation in the actual fabrication of the work. Artist led workshops are designed to get people making art, perhaps using the same theme as the main commissioned artwork or maybe using the same materials.

• Community art
Occasionally a project demands that the community be involved fully at every stage in a work, including the final fabrication. In such projects the process is often more important than the final work, though the final work should still be something of which all those involved can be proud. Mosaic has a unique place in such works, the simple act of placing a tile makes it a great equaliser.


Involving the local community in the production of any site specific artwork is central to its success.

Community involvement in producing artwork for public places does not mean the work must be of a lower quality. Good community artwork using the artists expertise in the right manner should produce the highest quality results. In fact the work must do so in order to foster the necessary respect for the work from the community, and to give the maximum pride in their achievement for those who took part.

Community involvement and consultation can take a wide range of forms, falling into four main areas:

• Pre-design consultation and research
In creating a work that has true regard for its site local research can prove crucial. This research can take the form of both archive investigation and simply talking to local residents and other community members. In the past Gary has undertaken oral history workshops with local elderly people to discover personal stories of a local neighbourhood and held stalls at local fairs to publicise and consult on planned works.

• Design consultation
All the above starting points offer a rich soup of inspiration from which Gary can draw up specific designs. On most projects two or three design options are produced. These design options can then be further consulted on to ensure broad support for the work. Design consultation also helps bring the public along with the development of the work, aiding publicity and preventing any feelings of work just appearing in a community.

• Parallel art workshops
Parallel workshops are an excellent way to involve local interested parties in an artwork that does not allow participation in the actual fabrication of the work. Artist led workshops are designed to get people making art, perhaps using the same theme as the main commissioned artwork or maybe using the same materials.

• Community art
Occasionally a project demands that the community be involved fully at every stage in a work, including the final fabrication. In such projects the process is often more important than the final work, though the final work should still be something of which all those involved can be proud. Mosaic has a unique place in such works, the simple act of placing a tile makes it a great equaliser.


 
 
 
Enquire
 

Related entries

  • Drostle Public Arts: Mural artists
    Mural artists
    Drostle Public Arts
    Artist Gary Drostle has been designing and creating site-specific mural artworks for over 20 years. His murals can be seen across the UK in hospitals, schools, public buildings and town centres. Work is designed and produced in...
  • Drostle Public Arts: 7.5m-high De Luci Fish gateway feature for roundabout
    7.5m-high De Luci Fish gateway feature for roundabout
    Drostle Public Arts
    A dramatic landmark gateway feature for the main roundabout entering Erith in Kent was commissioned by the London Borough of Bexley. This 7.5m high mosaic sculpture stands on the roundabout at Bronze Age Way on the A206 marking...

More murals by Drostle Public Arts

View all

Also by Drostle Public Arts

Drostle Public Arts address and contact details

Drostle Public Arts Ltd
Studio B - The Lakeside Centre
Bazalgette Way
London
SE2 9AN
Tel: 07719 529520
View on map
 
Follow Drostle Public Arts
 
Not found what you're looking for? View other options